The Psychology of Color

The psychology of color is one of the most interesting and controversial aspects of marketing. There has always been debate on the importance of color in marketing and its effect on persuasion. According to a study titled, The Impact of Color in Marketing, Satyendra Singh describes that the typical person makes up their mind within 90 seconds of their initial interaction with either people or products. She also claims that about 62-90 percent of the assessment is based on colors alone.

It is believed that the most effective colors for advertising are those that stimulate the viewer’s senses. Warm colors, such as red and yellow, are known to make people feel comfortable, and encourage them to linger—a reason why many restaurants primarily use warm color schemes. Nearly all logos, advertisements, and menus of fast food chains feature reds, oranges, and yellows. This is because warm colors are some of the best colors for advertising food, as they are known to increase the appetite, which may translate to higher revenue.

Cool colors on the other hand, like blues and greens, are very calming colors often associated with knowledge and understanding—why many businesses tend to use a cool color pallet. Darker shades of blue are known to indicate dependability and integrity making it a good color for business ads and logos; you will often notice financial companies incorporating dark blue. Shades of light blue seem to be very effective for advertising over-the-counter medicines and other health products. It is believed that light blue has a calming effect on people and it is most often associated with health and healing.

One last color pallet to point out is black and white. People often underestimate the power of the simplicity behind a black and white color scheme. According to research, these are two of the best colors for advertising because they create a strong contrast when paired together. Black and white often indicate opposites—white associated with purity and freedom, while black is interpreted as elegant, powerful, and/or evil. However, when used together, black and white can give off a highly professional feel for the brand.
color-emotion