Category Archives: Analytics

The Contact Form

The goal of a landing page is to collect information from site visitors with the hope that they will be converted into a customer. From a business standpoint, we would like as much information as possible from these potentials. However, the average site visitor wants to spend as little time as possible filling out the contact form to get access to the offer they’re trying to receive.

In an article from HubSpot’s Social Media Scientist, Dan Zarella, looks at which types of form fields lower or increase customer conversation rate. From his studies we are able to analyze the best approach to a successful contact form.

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In Zarella’s studies, he found that as the number of form fields increases, conversation rates of customers slightly decrease.

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This graph represents as the number of single line text fields increase, there is a small decrease in conversation rate.

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This next graph shows that multiple text areas have a noticeably shrinking effect on conversation rate.

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Lastly, this graph proves that multiple drop down fields, can lower your companies conversation rate.

We can infer from Zarella’s study that the fewer form fields implemented on your landing page will bring you greater conversation feedback. In fact, conversation rate improves by almost half when the number of form fields are reduced from four fields to three- that is a 50% increase!

A few small details that will keep your contact form most efficient is by reducing all friction. The more friction you can eliminate from the user experience, the more your conversation rate will increase. One way to do this is by creating trust on your page. Reconsider the information you are requesting in your form fields; if you do not need it right away, get it from the user later. Another thing you might want to consider is providing the user with help text. By utilizing help text, you are telling the customer exactly how to fill out the form by eliminating any extra thinking on their end. Last but not least, don’t be afraid to design your contact form; it should be memorable to the customer, as well as clean, simple and efficient.

Effective Design: The Grid System

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Web design is much more than how a site might look in the eye of the viewer. An effective website is primarily focused on form and function. As a designer, it is important to not get caught up in the look of the site, but to go back to the skeleton and focus on the layout of the content you are working with. It does not matter how talented you are in Photoshop and Illustrator, if your content is randomly scattered along the page, the appearance is messy, unorganized, and difficult to navigate, resulting in sub-optimal Google Analytics.

This is where a grid system is very effective. A grid system is used to arrange content into a clean, organized structure by implementing horizontal and vertical lines. By arranging content in consistent way like this, the presentation is much more readable, making it easy for the viewer to absorb.

A few things to keep in mind when designing your page layout is the “F” pattern design. Eye tracking studies have identified that when people enter a website, they quickly scan the page in an “F” shape pattern; left to right, and top to bottom. This is evident that your design must have an effective flow line. A flow line typically enters the page from the top left-hand corner, carrying the eye horizontally across the page. This is the base of your structure for you to impose starting and stopping points when aligning your text and images.

Your grid should organize your graphic elements in relation to the page, as well as each other. Whether you decide to implement a three-column, four-column, or six-column grid—commit to it. Consistency is the most important thing as it will only help you later when applying your content to the page.

Enhanced CPC: Is This Always The Right Choice?

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When choosing a click-focused bid strategy, is clicking the “Enable Enhanced CPC” button always the right choice? What Enhanced CPC means is exactly how it sounds, it optimizes your cost per click if Adwords presumes it as beneficial, or not beneficial, to your campaign. This feature can increase your bids for clicks by up to 30% if deemed good for the campaign, and lower the bid by any amount if it seems that the campaign will not benefit. Seems awesome right? This may not necessarily be the case.

While Enhanced CPC can be beneficial for a campaign with a good history of conversion data, a new campaign with Enhanced CPC will most likely not perform at its best. It can drive down traffic for a new campaign and make your campaign not work as how you would’ve hoped.  It’s not going to do a good job if there is no data to base its bid decisions over. What is our verdict?

Use it for a campaign with good historic conversion data. This is where the Enhanced CPC feature may perform at its best and be the most beneficial to your Adwords campaign, with potential for increased conversion rate, increase ROI, and overall lower costs. However,for a new campaign, we recommend not using it. Be smart with Enhanced CPC, make sure it’s right for you.

PPC Tips: What Do You Do On A Weekly Basis?

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When we are called here for PPC consultation or to take over someone’s campaign, we often find that a decent campaign is created, however it is left stagnant and on “autopilot”. The thing with PPC is that is cannot be left to run on its own! Things change in Adwords (Bing too!) in minutes, even seconds at a time, leaving your well performing keyword potentially in the dust in no time. We have developed some “best practices” at Web-Op to optimize our marketing campaigns. These have to monitored daily, and even hourly in some instances.  So how should you keep a close eye on your Adwords/Bing campaign? Follow some of these tips from the experts here at Web-Op.

  • Identify the poor performers: These are the “low hanging fruit”. Poor performers can include ads/keywords with low CTR, low clicks, or low conversions, depending on the age of the campaign. We also leverage data from Google Analytics which can tell us things like bounce rate and average visit duration. Poor performers are a gigantic waste of money. Without keeping a close eye on these, you are just throwing money away for nothing.
  • Negative keywords: Let’s say you are advertising keywords like “computer repair services”. You may not want your ads to come up in search terms like “do it yourself computer repair”. Constant addition of negative keywords to your campaign can be very beneficial, and can keep your overall performance metrics toward the high-side.
  • Average position: Keywords are given position, and this is something very important to watch for. Usually the top 3 positions have the best performance. We have found that position 2 (out of the 3) has the worst performance. We like to aim for position 1 to 3. Every keyword bid is different, so getting the optimal position can be quite tricky.
  • Fix match types: Depending on the client, campaign, and budget, we will choose to mix keyword match types. With broad match terms, we have found that is it important to scale these back and use these as a good way to find what the best search terms are. Through scaling back broad match and adding search terms as a phrase match, we have seen the following statistics after just a week of managing PPC for a health supplement:
    • Spend reduced 11.5%
    • Conversions Increased 7%
    • Cost Per Conversion Decreased 14.5%
    • Conversion Rate increased 19%
    • ROI increased 160%
  • Budgets: In the end, you are spending the client’s money when managing their PPC campaign. Be wary of their daily budgets and if anything is getting maxed out, you can scale back on the poor performers or lower the position. More clicks for less money? Yup, it’s worth it.

PPC can be quite tricky, and it is for good reason. It takes a well optimized campaign, as well as the proper capital, to really get some good, solid, consistent performance. Don’t turn on autopilot, keep a close eye on your campaigns. You will be happy you did.

Tracking TV Ads With Google Analytics

as-seen-on-tv copyTracking visits and conversions from offline campaigns, such as TV ads, can be a difficult task if you don’t set things up correctly.

The answer is to set up Google Analytics link taggging tool and web page redirects.  The first thing you need to do is decide what URL you want to send this offline traffic to. You have three options:

  1. New domain (examplesite.com)
  2. Subdomain (deal.example.com)
  3. subfolder (example.com/deal)

After you decide what URL you are going to use you need to set the page up to redirect to a custom URL like example.com/?Utm_source=tv. In Google analytics we would see the source of the traffic was TV.

Example

A tire company has a website named arizonatires.com and runs a tv advertisement. On the tv advertisement they tell people to visit aztires.com. When people click on aztires.com they are redirected to arizonatires.com/?Utm_source=tv.